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Archaeological Sites

Natural Wonders

Gastronomy

Culture and Traditions

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Destinations

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Adventure and Nature

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Magical Towns

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SIMBOLOGIA-PUEBLOS-MAGICOS-1

MAGICAL LAND WITH ANCIENT TRADITIONS

It is a magical land that traces the origins of its name to the Maya language, "Place where everything happened" or "Manik," a day in the Maya calendar associated with the deer.

Although there are no exact records of its earliest occupation, archaeological evidence at the Xcabachen cenote and the explored architectural complexes in Tipikal suggest that human groups settled there around the Middle Preclassic period, approximately between 1000 and 400 BCE.

It was the first Maya community where Franciscan missionaries arrived to build the convent dedicated to San Miguel Arcángel. During the Mesoamerican Postclassic period, it was the political capital of the Tutulxiu Maya. After their defeat by the colonizers, the Batab Xiu of Maní allied with the Spanish.

One of the most tragic stories of Maní is the burning of Maya codices by Fray Diego de Landa during an Auto de Fe, as this Spanish cleric considered the scientific works of the Maya "nothing but the lies of the Devil." He collected all their idols and codices on history, medicine, and traditions and burned them in a large bonfire in front of the monastery.

Later, perhaps out of repentance, Diego de Landa wrote a book describing everything he had learned from the Maya.

Maní is approximately 91 km (about one hour) from the city of Mérida, 228 km (2 hours and 45 minutes) from Valladolid, and 182 km (2 and a half hours) from Campeche.

Maní

What to See in Man

Tourist Attractions in Mani

Convento de San Miguel Arcángel (Convent)

Founded in 1549, it was mainly built between the 16th and 17th centuries, using stones from pre-Hispanic Maya constructions. The initial works were carried out by Friar Juan de Mérida. It was the site of one of the first evangelization schools and one of the first hospitals in America.

The highlight is the majestic open chapel, one of the largest in all of Latin America, which preserves some details on its walls. Standing in front of it allows you to contemplate centuries of history that the place holds.

The convent comprises a large rectangular atrium, a "posa" chapel, an open chapel, the main church with four chapels, a cloister, the conventual precinct, a garden, and the remains of the old Indian school.

Inside the church and the convent, there are murals from the 16th century and seven altars with five polychrome retablos from the 17th century.

Town Center

The downtown of this beautiful Magical Town is filled with stories and legends that many of its inhabitants will be more than willing to share with you. Walking among the ancient buildings, squares, and churches will transport you to another era.

Cenote Xcabachen

You can learn about the legend that surrounds the Xcabachen cenote, one of the main attractions in Maní. Its name means "well" because the cenote's structure resembles a well.

The ancient legend tells that many years ago, the Maya predicted that when the water runs out in the world, the only place that will still have water is this cenote. But when people go to fetch it, a Mayan guardian will appear, accompanied by a serpent. This serpent is the god Kukulcán, and those who want to drink from the well will have to pay a high price.

The cenote itself is a downhill cave, and while swimming is not allowed due to its structure, it is possible to visit. For many locals, it metaphorically represents an entrance to the underworld.

What to Do in Maní

Select your Adventure in Yucatán

UNMISSABLE EXPERIENCES IN MANÍ

Visit the Meliponarios (Apiaries)

Meliponas are a species of stingless bees, and in Maní, their breeding is promoted by offering tourists a tour of five meliponarios. This visit allows you to learn about the benefits of these bees and offers a culturally rich experience, much like honey.

In these meliponarios, you will also learn about Maní's cultural wealth through activities related to the breeding and care of these stingless bees. Additionally, you can participate in workshops to create products based on honey, ceremonies, and even rituals. For the Maya, the honey of the melipona bee has magical properties that make it medicinal and nutritious.

Explore the Surroundings by Bicycle

This beautiful Magical Town is perfect for exploring its surroundings by bicycle while enjoying its beautiful landscapes.

Explore other destinations in Yucatán

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